Hi, I'm Andrew and I’m just a simple 19 year old guy and zoology student that posts random factoids about obscure animals and general animal science/zoology/biology stuff so if you like animals this is the place for you, if you only like cute animals this is not the place for you… Also I can ID any animals you might need identified (just submit them to me).

Disclamer: none of the pictures are mine unless stated

Family Callidulidae: An unusual family of moths known as "Old World Butterfly-moths. Callidulids are a family of butterfly like moths which are distributed throughout southeast Asia and Oceania. Callidulids can exhibit both day and night flying behavior and typically hold their wings over thier backs like butterflies. Thier closest relatives are know truly known but they are thought to be close to hook-tip and geometer moths.

Image: L. Shyamal

 

Kimberley Rock Monitor (Varanus glauerti)
Also known as Glauert’s Monitor, the Kimberley rock monitor is a species of Monitor lizard (Varanidae) which is endemic to Northern Australia. True to their common name Kimberley rock monitors typically inhabit rocky cliff faces, but are also found in humid forests. Kimberley rock monitors are chiefly arboreal and feed mostly on small animals and eggs.
Classifcation
Animalia-Chordata-Reptilia-Squamata-Lacertilia-Varanidae-Varanus-(Odatria)-V. glauerti
Image: Haplochromis

Kimberley Rock Monitor (Varanus glauerti)

Also known as Glauert’s Monitor, the Kimberley rock monitor is a species of Monitor lizard (Varanidae) which is endemic to Northern Australia. True to their common name Kimberley rock monitors typically inhabit rocky cliff faces, but are also found in humid forests. Kimberley rock monitors are chiefly arboreal and feed mostly on small animals and eggs.

Classifcation

Animalia-Chordata-Reptilia-Squamata-Lacertilia-Varanidae-Varanus-(Odatria)-V. glauerti

Image: Haplochromis

Aquilonastra chantalae
…is a small species of Asterinid starfish which is distributed throughout Indo-Pacific waters. Like other sea stars of the family Asterinidae Aquilonastra chantalae feeds mainly on detritus and other organic material. 
Classification
Animalia-Echinodermata-Asteroidea-Valvatida-Asterinidae-Aquilonastra-A. chantalae
Image: Chantal Conand

Aquilonastra chantalae

…is a small species of Asterinid starfish which is distributed throughout Indo-Pacific waters. Like other sea stars of the family Asterinidae Aquilonastra chantalae feeds mainly on detritus and other organic material. 

Classification

Animalia-Echinodermata-Asteroidea-Valvatida-Asterinidae-Aquilonastra-A. chantalae

Image: Chantal Conand

Ocellated Lionfish (Dendrochirus biocellatus)
Also known as the Twospot Turkeyfish, the ocellated lionfish is a species of scorpionfish (Scorpanidae) which is widespread throughout the tropical waters of the Indo-West Pacific. Like other scorpionfish occelated lionfish are posses venomous spines which can cause extreme pain. Ocellated lionfish are predators and will feed on a variety of crustaceans and sometimes even small fish. 
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Scorpaeniformes-Scorpaenidae-Dendrochirus-D. biocellatus
Image: Maupin Delphine

Ocellated Lionfish (Dendrochirus biocellatus)

Also known as the Twospot Turkeyfish, the ocellated lionfish is a species of scorpionfish (Scorpanidae) which is widespread throughout the tropical waters of the Indo-West Pacific. Like other scorpionfish occelated lionfish are posses venomous spines which can cause extreme pain. Ocellated lionfish are predators and will feed on a variety of crustaceans and sometimes even small fish. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Scorpaeniformes-Scorpaenidae-Dendrochirus-D. biocellatus

Image: Maupin Delphine

Anonymous asked
Do you also identify plants/ trees when asked?

I would, but know signifiacatly less about plants, and don’t trust myself to ID them properly. 

Genus: Gigantactis
…is a genus of Whipnose Anglers (Gigantactinidae) which occur in most oceans, at deep depths of around 1,000-2,500 meters (3,300-8,200 ft). Like their namesake suggests members of Gigantactis posses elongated Illicium (their “lures”) with bioluminescent photophores at their end. In typical angler fashion these are used to lure prey into striking distance. 
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Lophiiformes-Gigantactinidae-Gigantactis
Image: Theodore W. Pietsch 

Genus: Gigantactis

is a genus of Whipnose Anglers (Gigantactinidae) which occur in most oceans, at deep depths of around 1,000-2,500 meters (3,300-8,200 ft). Like their namesake suggests members of Gigantactis posses elongated Illicium (their “lures”) with bioluminescent photophores at their end. In typical angler fashion these are used to lure prey into striking distance. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Lophiiformes-Gigantactinidae-Gigantactis

Image: Theodore W. Pietsch 


Hey Andrew! Sorry this isn’t a moth! This was found in north-central Ohio on a small lake. It looks like some kind of Clubtail dragonfly but I can’t narrow it down to the species, do you know?

Hi! This guy looks to be a Russet-tipped Clubtail (Stylurus plagiatus). I haven’t heard of this species being seen too much in Ohio, so nice find!

Hey Andrew! Sorry this isn’t a moth! This was found in north-central Ohio on a small lake. It looks like some kind of Clubtail dragonfly but I can’t narrow it down to the species, do you know?

Hi! This guy looks to be a Russet-tipped Clubtail (Stylurus plagiatus). I haven’t heard of this species being seen too much in Ohio, so nice find!

Snowberry Clearwing (Hemaris diffinis)

…is a species of “Hummingbird” Sphinx Moth (Sphingidae) which is widely distributed throughout North America. Adult snowberry clearwings are often seen in flowery fields during the day where they will feed, like the hummingbirds they are named after, on nectar from flowers. Snowberry clearwings are typically seen flying from March to September, however this season can be shorter the north north they occur. Snowberry clearwings will have two generations per year. With caterpillars feeding on dogbane, honeysuckle, and of course snowberry. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Bombycoidea-Sphingidae-Macroglossinae-Dilophonotini-Hemaris-H. diffinis

Images: Cody Hough and Lonnie Huffman


Found in the Netherlands, about 3 cm long. Could you identify it?

I’m not sure that I can. It seems that this poor guy has lost most, if not all, of his scales and setae. So it would be pretty hard for a non expert to ID him, Sorry :S If I had to guess his family though, I’d say he looks like an Arctiid of some sort.

Found in the Netherlands, about 3 cm long. Could you identify it?

I’m not sure that I can. It seems that this poor guy has lost most, if not all, of his scales and setae. So it would be pretty hard for a non expert to ID him, Sorry :S If I had to guess his family though, I’d say he looks like an Arctiid of some sort.

White-flannel Moth (Norape ovina)

…a species of Flannel Moth (Megalopygidae) which occurs in the southern United States south into South America. Adult white-flannel moths are typically on the wing from April to May and in some places July to October. They typically have two generations per year thorough most of their range, although hit is likely there are more in the southern areas of their range. White-flannel moth caterpillars are known to feed on Hackberry and Redbud.

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Zygaenoidea-Megalopygidae-Norape-N. ovina

Image: ©John Pickering


I live in New York city and this thing fell out from my curtains as i was opening them. what is it? And is it safe to attempt to pick it up and throw it outside? here are more photos and a video of it trying to turn over.
http://megatron-griffin.tumblr.com/post/93019678608
 http://megatron-griffin.tumblr.com/post/93019455148/it-fell-out-from-my-curtains

It’s hard for me to say for sure with it being upside down but I’m almost certain that this is a Grapevine Beetle (Pelidonata punctata). Its totally harmless to pick it up and put it back outside, I’m sure it will be thankful for it :)

I live in New York city and this thing fell out from my curtains as i was opening them. what is it? And is it safe to attempt to pick it up and throw it outside? here are more photos and a video of it trying to turn over.

http://megatron-griffin.tumblr.com/post/93019678608

 http://megatron-griffin.tumblr.com/post/93019455148/it-fell-out-from-my-curtains

It’s hard for me to say for sure with it being upside down but I’m almost certain that this is a Grapevine Beetle (Pelidonata punctata). Its totally harmless to pick it up and put it back outside, I’m sure it will be thankful for it :)

astronomy-to-zoology:

Twenty-plume Moth (Alucita hexadactyla)

…a species of many-plumed moth (Alucitidae) which is native to parts of Europe, but has been introduced into North America. Like other members of its family A. hexadactyla does not have the typical two pairs of scaled wings other moths have, instead it has ~20 thin plumes (which are also lined with small scales). Adult A. hexadactlya can be seen flying throughout most, if not all, of the year. A. hexadactlya caterpillars feed almost exclusively on honeysukle (Lonicera spp.) and are leaf miners, which means they will tunnel inside the leaf to feed whilst avoiding predators. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Alucitidae-Alucita-A. hexadactyla

Image: ©entomart


This guy made me yell out a slew of profanities after I finished my shower.
I know miller moths by sight, but dunno what this one is. I live in Colorado, near the plains.

It looks like you have yourself a Copper Underwing (Amphipyra pyramidoides). Its pretty weird seeing one of them inside a house. 

This guy made me yell out a slew of profanities after I finished my shower.

I know miller moths by sight, but dunno what this one is. I live in Colorado, near the plains.

It looks like you have yourself a Copper Underwing (Amphipyra pyramidoides). Its pretty weird seeing one of them inside a house. 


Hi there! Just wondered if you have any idea what kind of moth this is?? It was found in a friends house in Birmingham, England. Thanks!

I’m not the best with European moths but I believe this is a Swallow-tailed Moth (Ourapteryx sambucaria)

Hi there! Just wondered if you have any idea what kind of moth this is?? It was found in a friends house in Birmingham, England. Thanks!

I’m not the best with European moths but I believe this is a Swallow-tailed Moth (Ourapteryx sambucaria)

Rosy Maple Moth (Dryocampa rubicunda)

…a beautiful species of Royal Moth (Ceratocampinae) which occurs in Eastern North America. Like other Saturniid moths adult rosy maple moths lack mouthparts and live short lives dedicated solely to breeding. In the north they typically fly from May-August (with one brood) and in the south they fly from April-September (2-3 broods). Rosy maple moth caterpillars are typically known as Green-striped Mapleworms and are commonly seen feeding on maples (Acer spp.), sycamore (Platanus spp.), beech (Fagus spp.) and oaks (Quercus spp.) 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Bombycoidea-Saturniidae-Ceratocampinae-Dryocampa-D. rubicunda

Images: Mike Boone and PiccoloNamek  

Twenty-plume Moth (Alucita hexadactyla)

…a species of many-plumed moth (Alucitidae) which is native to parts of Europe, but has been introduced into North America. Like other members of its family A. hexadactyla does not have the typical two pairs of scaled wings other moths have, instead it has ~20 thin plumes (which are also lined with small scales). Adult A. hexadactlya can be seen flying throughout most, if not all, of the year. A. hexadactlya caterpillars feed almost exclusively on honeysukle (Lonicera spp.) and are leaf miners, which means they will tunnel inside the leaf to feed whilst avoiding predators. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Alucitidae-Alucita-A. hexadactyla

Image: ©entomart