Hi, I'm Andrew and I’m just a simple 19 year old guy and zoology student that posts random factoids about obscure animals and general animal science/zoology/biology stuff so if you like animals this is the place for you, if you only like cute animals this is not the place for you… Also I can ID any animals you might need identified (just submit them to me).

Disclamer: none of the pictures are mine unless stated

Family Callidulidae: An unusual family of moths known as "Old World Butterfly-moths. Callidulids are a family of butterfly like moths which are distributed throughout southeast Asia and Oceania. Callidulids can exhibit both day and night flying behavior and typically hold their wings over thier backs like butterflies. Thier closest relatives are know truly known but they are thought to be close to hook-tip and geometer moths.

Image: L. Shyamal

 

Maiden’s Blush (Cyclophora puncataria)

…a species of Geometer Moth (Geometridae) which is distributed throughout Europe. Maiden’s blush caterpillars are associated with oak trees and feed almost exclusively on oak leaves. Adult maiden’s blush typically fly from May to June and in western Europe into August. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Geometroidea-Geometridae-Cyclophora-C. puncataria

Image: Svdmolen

The Shark (Cucullia umbractica

…is a species of Noctuid moth that is distributed throughout much of the Palearctic ecozone, occurring in Europe, Russia, Afghanistan, Turkestan, and Mongolia. Sharks are fairly large moths with individuals boasting wingspans of 52-60 mm! Adult sharks will typically fly from June to July and will feed at night on nectar. Shark caterpillars have many recorded food plants, but mainly feed on sow thistles and Lactuca spp. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Noctuidae-Cuculliinae-Cucullia-C. umbratica

Image: ©entomart

Bactra lancealana

…a species of Leafroller Moth (Torticidae) which is distributed throughout Europe. B. lancealana larvae are typically associated with and feed various ‘rushes’, including Junucs spp. and Scipus spp. Adult Bactra lancelana are usually seen flying from May to October. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Cossina-Torticidae-Bactra-(Bactra)-B. lancealana

Image: James K. Lindsey


Found this guy on the hood of my car, about the size of a hornet, in central WI, USA. 

Wow, great find! You found yourself a Wasp Mantidfly (Climaciella brunnea). Despite its common name this guy is neither a wasp or a mantis (or a fly) and is actually closely related to lacewings and their allies. 
Oh and also this guy is totally harmless he’s just mimicking a wasp and cannot sting. 

Found this guy on the hood of my car, about the size of a hornet, in central WI, USA. 

Wow, great find! You found yourself a Wasp Mantidfly (Climaciella brunnea). Despite its common name this guy is neither a wasp or a mantis (or a fly) and is actually closely related to lacewings and their allies. 

Oh and also this guy is totally harmless he’s just mimicking a wasp and cannot sting. 

"Tropical Swallowtail Moth" (Lyssa zampa)

…a species of Uraniid moth which ranges from the Himalayas to Borneo and the rest of the Malay Peninsula. Adult L. zampa boast a 6 inch wingspan and will fly from June to November, location depending. Lyssa zampa larvae feed on Endospermum sp and other members of Euphorbiaceae. 

Classification

Animalia-Athropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Uraniidae-Lyssa-L. zampa

Image: CEphoto, Uwe Aranas

Stathmopoda pedella

…is a species of concealer moth (Oecophoridae) which is found throughout Europe. Stathmopoda pedella caterpillars will feed on the seeds of fruits of Alder (Alnus spp.). Adults typically fly in July, depending mostly on their location. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Oecophoridae-Stathmopoda-S. pedella

Image: Olaf Leillinger

Boisduval’s Autumn Moth (Oenosandra boisuvalii)

…a species of Oenosandrid moth which is the sole member of the monotypic genus Oenosandra. Boisduval’s autumn moths are endemic to the southern half of Australia, including Tasmania. Boisduval’s autumn moth caterpillars are commonly associated with and feed on Eucalyptus spp. 

Classification

Animalia-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Noctuoidea-Oenosandridae-Oenosandra-O. boisduvalli

Image(s): Donald Hobern

Small Emperor Moth (Saturnia pavonia)

…a species of Saturniid moth which occurs throughout most of the Palearctic region, and its the only member of its family to be found in the British Isles. Adult small emperor moths are chiefly nocturnal and will fly from mid-April to late June Like other saturniid moths adult S. pavonia have no mouthparts and cannot feed, their caterpillars however have a wide variety of recorded food plants. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Saturnidae-Saturniinae-Saturnia-S. pavonia

Image: Jean-pierre Hamon

Axia margarita

…is a species of Gold Moth (Cimeliidae) which occurs in Morocco, Spain, southern France, Istria, and southern Carniola. Adult A. margarita typically are on the wing during the day. Two generations generally hatch each year, with adults flying from April to October. Axia margarita larvae are typically associated with Euphorbium spp. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Cimellidae-Axia-A. margarita

Image: Dumi

Small Eggar (Eriogaster lanestris)

…a species of Lappet Moth (Lasiocampidae) which occurs in most of Eurasia, ranging as far as the Amur River. Small eggar caterpillars will feed on Birch, Prunus spp, and Crateagus spp. Like other members of the family Lasiocampidae small eggar caterpillars will construct elaborate communal “tents” made out of silk. Adult small eggars will fly from March to April.

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Lasiocampidae-Eriogaster-E. lanestris

Images: Didier Descouens and Markus Hagenlocher

Epicopeia hainesii

…is a species of Oriental Swallowtail Moth (Epicopeiidae) which is distributed throughout the Korean Peninsula, Japan, and Taiwan. Like other members of its family E. hainesii looks very similar to the swallowtail butterflies of the family Papilionidae, and possibly mimics them. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Epicopeiidae-Epicopeia-E. hainesii

Images: 三上 勝生 and うり

Hemerophila diva

Sometimes known as the “Diva Hemerophila Moth” H. diva is a colorful species of metalmark moth (Choreutidae) which occurs in Cuba and more rarely in Florida. H. diva larvae feed almost exclusively on Ficus species and will curl their leaves and skeletonize their surface. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Choreutoidea-Choreutidae-Hemerophila-H. diva

Image(s):  © Jeff Hollenbeck

Scarlet Tiger Moth (Callimorpha dominula)

…a colorful species of Arctiid tiger moth (Arctiinae) which occurs in Southern Europe and the Middle East, ranging from Turkey to northern Iran. Adult scarlet tiger moths are day flying and will take nectar. Their larvae, on the other hand, feed mostly on comfrey (Symphytum officinale). Three different color morphs of C. dominula exist: One with yellow hindwings and body, one with red hindwings, and one with extended black on its hindwings.  

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Erebidae-Arctiinae-Callimorpha-C. dominula

Image: Emanresu


Hello! This guy was on my front door in southern Alberta. I thought he might fit in with moth week if you would be so kind as to ID him for me :) Thank you in advance!

It looks like you have Lasiocampid moth of some sort, specifically it looks like an Forest Tent Caterpillar Moth (Malacosoma disstria)

Hello! This guy was on my front door in southern Alberta. I thought he might fit in with moth week if you would be so kind as to ID him for me :) Thank you in advance!

It looks like you have Lasiocampid moth of some sort, specifically it looks like an Forest Tent Caterpillar Moth (Malacosoma disstria)


Sorry for the extremely shitty image quality, but these guys were really hard to photograph on a breezy day! I found about 15+ of these cocoons(?) hanging from a tree by nearly invisible strands of something. They were blowing around in the wind and impossible to keep in focus on my camera. 
As I hope you can see, some of these appeared to be hatching, with little worms/caterpillars wiggling around out of the top of the cocoons. 
This was in Lincoln, Nebraska. I have never seen anything like them before! Any clue what they are?

Hmmm….Its hard to say for sure with this photo but these look alot like the bags of bagworm moths (Psychidae). I’m not sure why they are all hanging like that. Perhaps the wind knocked them down from the tree and they are trying to ‘string themselves back up’ 

Sorry for the extremely shitty image quality, but these guys were really hard to photograph on a breezy day! I found about 15+ of these cocoons(?) hanging from a tree by nearly invisible strands of something. They were blowing around in the wind and impossible to keep in focus on my camera. 

As I hope you can see, some of these appeared to be hatching, with little worms/caterpillars wiggling around out of the top of the cocoons. 

This was in Lincoln, Nebraska. I have never seen anything like them before! Any clue what they are?

Hmmm….Its hard to say for sure with this photo but these look alot like the bags of bagworm moths (Psychidae). I’m not sure why they are all hanging like that. Perhaps the wind knocked them down from the tree and they are trying to ‘string themselves back up’